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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 92 (some duplicates have been removed)
♪ [music] jane harman: good afternoon and welcome to the wilson center. welcome to the people sitting in this auditorium, those in overflow rooms, those who are listening to us or watching us in various media and who will intersect us on the internet sometime in the next days and weeks. i'm jane harman, president and ceo of the wilson center. and as some of you know, we recently joined forces with npr to create this year-long public event series that we call the national conversation. npr's president and ceo, my california buddy gary knell who has a muppet, which is an improvement on himself, named after him for his roles, his role before on running sesame street is sitting in the front row, as is joe gildenhorn, ambassador joe gildenhorn who is the chairman of the wilson center board of trustees. and i'd like to welcome many other friends here today. my hope is that this series will provide the public, that is you, with new opportunities to engage in much-needed civil discourse free from spin, imagine that in this election season, in the safe political space that the wilson c
that is just after 8:00 a.m. eastern. then on c-span at noon, the wilson center and a discussion on middle east policy. includes the jordanian ambassador to the united states. >> how does one adequately express the feeling about a special friend? >> when a friend is also a world icon. a national hero of unimaginable proportions. and the legend whose name will live in history long after all today have been forgotten >> they look down kindly onus when she chose neil to be thend first adventure to another world. and to havthe opportunity to look back from space at the beauty of our own. it could've been another comment but it wasn't. it wasn't for a reason. no one, but no one could have accepted the respns
the question would be whether she would want to come back from her job heading the woodrow wilson center so soon after she basically quit the congress. john brennan, the president's counterterrorism advisor, would be another choice that i think would probably be very easily confirmed on capitol hill. however, the problem is the president has really come to rely on brennan as his right hand man throughout his presidency on all the issues of counterterrorism that arise, and those are not all c.i.a. issues. i think the president would probably be very reluctant to have brennan leave his side and go work full-time at the c.i.a. and only have him sort of around occasionally. some of the other names on the list are possibilities, but the question would be what the confirmation process would look like with congress, because both brennan and tom donlan have been considered for various jobs, but the administration seems to have reluctant to put them through a confirmation process because of either issues or resistance that they might face in the senate. host: josh gerstein is the white house reporte
and president of the woodrow wilson international center for scholars. she has returned from cairo. you have been there three times, while we're seeing at the moment in egypt, are those the birth pains of a new democracy or is this something mysterious? >> i do not think we now. i think the crowd that wanted revolution does not have a clue how to build a democracy. and the techniques they seem to be using our boycott and protest. those are valuable tools but engaging the government and insisting on a compromise would be a better tool to get a constitution they can live with. at the moment, at least 30 of them out of 100 have walked out of the assembly, which is a group of drafting the constitution. they claim they did cut deals and were undercut after they left the room and they climbed the document is inadequate. if i were they and i recommended this to some of them, i would go right back into the room and not move until i was heard. on the other side, the government is in a rush to file the document. i think what morsi did reflects his fear that he will not be able to file on time and he w
of the woodrow wilson center. welcome to you all. let me start with you, alan dershowitz. a day that promised so much but in the end delivered very little. what is your reading of where we are with this? >> i don't think it promised all that much. i think all it really promised was some kind of a cooling-off period. i don't believe that there will be a cease-fire that will hold. the representative of the plo acknowledged that. he agreed with me. he said he thought in four years or three years or two years, israel would start it up again but that's not the way it works. the way it works is hamas decides whether because they want to testgypt or because they are told by iran or because of their own people that the time has come to renew the sending of rockets and once that happens, in a democracy like israel, there has to be a response. the israelis have to protect their civilians and so they then take action, military actions, and it's called the cycle of violence but it's not a cycle of violence. there's a difference between a double war crime committed by hamas, namely firing from behind civilia
of the woodrow wilson center. >> a woman who mosted comments about the president said she is not a racist. after the election the 22-year- old posted on her facebook page a racial slur and the words, maybe he will get assassinated this term. she delete that message and later said she was stating her opinion. her employer has fired her. the case has been turned over to the secret service. >>> some are now returning to restore the jersey shore nearly two weeks after sandy, those who used to live in the area got to return home for the first time yesterday. they were taken by bus to their former homes in seaside heights where they had an hour to pack what they could. some of them say they were not prepared for what they saw. >> you have a list and you are prepared to get what you want but you -- you spend like -- 15 minutes just devastated, just trying to look to see what's on the floor. >> reporter: at the main staging center in tom's river new jersey a company has been making restore the shore t- shirts to raise money for schools and shelters. more buses will take people in to the disaster zone e
's the current director of the woodrow wilson center in washington. she joins us live from cairo. representative harmon, thank you so much for joining us. israel and hamas, as you know, are meeting separately with egyptian officials. but i think it's important to point out that egypt is not a neutral negotiating partner in this. they have long been an ally of hamas. i ask you, during your trip there, are you hopeful that you can reach any sort of agreement to a cease-fire? >> well, actually, i am. i mean i'm not the one negotiating it, but this is my third visit to this marvelous country, the largest in the arab world, in a year. and at this time, even with gaza going on, there is reason for optimism about the egyptian economy, and future of an imf loan, and a constitution about to be drafted, hopefully that will include full, equal rights for women. but, gaza is on the minds of everybody here, and i have heard in the last hour or so, there is reason for optimism that a cease-fire could be announced as early as this afternoon and the role egyptians have played in helping broker that is viewed as
tv, "after words" with guest host james hershberg of the wilson center's cold war international history project. this week, david coleman and his latest book, "the fourteenth day: jfk and the aftermath of the cuban missile crisis." in it, the director of the miller center's presidential recordings program details the baseball in october 28, 1962, and shows that the public believes the cuban missile crisis had ended, president kennedy continue to walk a fine diplomatic line. >> host: as you know there's a ton of literature about the cuban missile crisis. most of this focusing on the 13 days as bobby kennedy's memoir was called back in 1969 and hollywood version with kevin costner what made you decide to focus on fmap? >> guest: two things i wanted to talk about in this book, two different tracks the end of dovetailing indian. personal, most of the books that cover the cuban missile crisis came on the 13th day. and on october 20 was khrushchev estes or he's going to back up and he agreed to fire every to message to withdraw missiles in cuba. the first question was, not what? what happene
, now c.e.o. of the woodrow wilson center. and matthew miller, who served as director of public affairs for attorney general eric holder at the department of justice until last year. matthew miller, is there anything unusual in that story that sari just laid out for us about how this case and how this investigation unfolded? is is there anything about how that played out that strikes you as unusual. >> i think everything about this case is unusual. there's not a lot of precedent to look at with a case like this. it really does seem to be an unprecedented case. but you look at the principles that the department follows when they conduct these types of investigations. one of the principles that they follow is that they don't share information about oni crinal investigations with people outside law enforcement while those investigations are being conducted. they do that for a couple of reasons. one quite frankly is to protect the reputation of people who may have committed no crime but would see their reputations unfairly maligned the second is to insulate their investigations from any pol
of these long-range high trajectory weapons. >> all right, aaron david miller from the woodrow wilson center. thank you so much for your time, sir. >> pleasure. >>> another explosion on an oil rig in the gulf of mexico brings back painful memories of the bp spill. we'll have an update on the latest off the coast of louisiana. >>> plus, michele bachmann's a tea party darling, but our next guest says the tea party is over. that's next. into their work, their name on the door, and their heart into their community. small business saturday is a day to show our support. a day to shop at stores owned by our friends and neighbors. and do our part for the businesses that do so much for us. on november 24th, let's get out and shop small. fire bad! just have to fire roast these tomatoes. this is going to give you a head start on your dinner. that seems easier [ female announcer ] new progresso recipe starters. five delicious cooking sauces you combine with fresh ingredients to make amazing home-cooked meals. i'm done! [ chuckles ] sweet [ female announcer ] swiffer's wet mopping cloths can clean better
at the wilson center, and she just returned from the region. i would add robin is a former kol he colleague of mine at the "washington post." i'm thrilled the three of you are here. three people who can tell us the meat of what's going on. robin, you were just there. both chuck and ayman indicated signs are moving in a direction of a ceasefire, but both were also cautious to say, look, you know, nothing is declared until everything is declared in that regard. does that jive with what you know coming out of there? >> i think everybody wants to see an end to the hostilities. the real problem is does this open the way for significant diplomacy? no ceasefire will last unless both sides deal with the realities. the palestinians have lived under conditions they think are unacceptable. hamas has been using its rockets to pressure israel. israel, you know, wants to make sure that hamas no longer targets civilian areas, and so both sides have an interest in ending the hostilities but there are differing levels in terms of does israel want to deal with hamas government. is it going to be suspicious a
at the woodrow wilson center. let's talk about this. benjamin netanyahu has support any time that israel is under attack or is involved in a military engagement. there is going to be political support for what it does. how do you assess what netanyahu can now do? how much leverage does he have to negotiate something that can hold up? >> well, i think the problem here andrea, there's no permanent state between israel and hamas. that's the problem with operation 809. it bought three plus years of relative tranquillity but allowed hamas to import more sophisticated high trajectory weapons that are not terribly accurate but they have range. the range is going to be combined with accuracy and the israelis will be presented with a much bigger problem than they are now. but the problem is, how do you negotiate an end state to this? you can't. what you're looking for is a stand down by both parties and perhaps the egyptians and the turks can find a way since the israelis will not, to enhance this arrangement with hamas with additional incentives. i think the bottom line here, though, given the fact that
hershberg of the wilson center's cold war international history project. this week, david coleman in his latest book, "the fourteenth day: jfk and the aftermath of the cuban missile crisis." .. was called but decide to focus on the aftermath than the crisis. >> guest: there's two things i wanted to talk about. two different tracks that end up dove tailing. most of the book cover the cuban missile crisis on the 13th day and he decided to back down. he agreed to withdrawal the missiles from cuba. the first question i had was now what? what happened. and interestingly, this is back to what happened. we know what happened in the weeks and months after that from the russian and cuban sources than we do from the american side. there hasn't been a lot of study on the american side about what happened. i would happen to work with the kennedy tapes. he was taping during the period. i had a remarkable window. i wanted to extend the story of the missile crisis to find out what happened then. because on the 13th day when he capitulated there was a missiles in cuba. there were tens and thousa
times." aus is robin wright as the woodrow wilson center here in washington. robin, you don't think that president morsi was trying to create a dictatorship overnight, but you think he did go too far. what do you think he was trying to accomplish? >> he did go too far and the timing was terrible, but the context is really important. egypt's judiciary had earlier this year had a democratically elected parliament. there were deep fears they were installing a new constitution. nald have set egypt back to square one to elect a new parliament and from na parliament create a new body to write a constitution. that's a process that could take a year, year and a half. this is time egypt doesn't have. there is a real interest in moving forward and creating solutions to the many problems left behind by the mubarak era. the problem throughout the region where you see changes is the deep polarization between islamic parties and secular forces and both sides deeply afraid the other side is going to create an islamic regime or take the countries that have undergone democratic transitions back into
. let's dig deeper right now, robin wright senior fellow at the woodrow wilson center in washington. robin, you don't think that president morsi was trying to create a dictator ship overnight, do you think he did go too far? what do you think he was trying to accomplish? >> he did go too far. and the timing was terrible. but the context is really important. egypt's judiciary had earlier this year had dissolved a democratically elected parliament. and there were deep fears the judiciary was moving in the next couple weeks to resolve an assembly that was working on a new constitution. the process could take a year, year and a half. this is time that egypt doesn't have. there's a real interest in moving forward and creating solutions to the many problems that have been left behind by the mubarak era. the problem throughout the region where you see changes is this deep polarization between islamist parties and secular forces and both sides being deeply afraid that the other side is going to create -- whether it's an islamic regime or take countries back into autocratic rule. >> steven,
-- woodrow wilson center and different other public affairs centers that i would not normally be exposed to. >> jeff wright watches c-span on comcast. c-span, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. we continue election analysis with live coverage of a congressional quarterly forum starting at 10:15 eastern. right now, house speaker john major held a briefing yesterday on avoiding automatic budget cuts and tax increases known as the fiscal cliff -- john boehner held a briefing yesterday. he did not take questions. >> good afternoon, everyone. let me offer my congratulations to president obama and the first lady and joe biden. i hope to the election were turned out differently. mitt romney and paul ryanair good men and leaders. i want to wish them well. the american people have spoken. they have reelected president obama and they have again reelected a republican majority in the house of representatives. if there is a mandate yesterday, it is a mandate to work together on the solutions to the challenges we face as a nation. my attitude is not a confrontation but convi
that through again. jane harman is another name we've heard. she is now of course head of the wilson center. she's been very close to th intelligence community for a numb of years. she's also very passionate about what they do over there and she hasn't tried very hard to hide that passion over the years. so she's another name we're hearing. but of course as the d and people sort of come back from the reeling shock of this announcement today, i think that will flush out a little bit better. >> jane harman was a member of the house intelligence committee for a long time. a long-time member of the house of representatives before leaving to become the head of the woodrow wilson center for scholars here in washington. suzanne kelly, thanks very much. just a while ago the white house released this written statement from president obama. let me read from part of it "by any measure david petraeus has made our nation safer and stronger. today, i accepted his resignation as director of the central intelligence agency and i am completely confidence that the cia will continue to thrive and carry. let's
with this issue. the woodrow wilson center will be having a panel talking about defining american priorities in the middle east. that is at noon. the moderator's the vice- president from new initiatives and a distinguished scholar historian. that will be woodrow wilson center event happening at noon today. from indiana on our line for independents, hi, omar. caller: hi. i did want to say that what israel is doing is horrendous. it has been going on, they killed 15,000 back and 119. 1400 back in 2006. already well over 100. i believe that if nuclear war comes to this world, israel will be because of it. and i also believe that country is going to be the downfall of our own country. thank you. host: let us go to upper malboro maryland, on our line for democrats. caller: i have no problem with the united states supporting israel, but they need to be even-handed. we support israel no matter what they do. but netanyahu knows the president is calling mr. to asia. -- is going on the trip to asia. all we have been talking about is what is going on in israel. israel does not want peace. because as lo
foreign policy. speakers at the woodrow wilson center in could robert maley, ron c-span 2, julius will speak about international telecommunications policy. live at 12:30 on our companion network c-span 2. and election news this morning, alan west house conceded to powder murphy, putting an end to one of the most expensive house races and the country. the washington post writes that after all of the votes were tallied, murphy held a slight lead but his margin was not strong enough to trigger an official recount. the republican pressed on. bill raising questions about ballots in st. lucie county. that is from the "washington post." allen west conceding to murphy. >> how does one adequately express his feelings about a special friend? when that friend is also a world of icon, a national hero of unimaginable proportions. and a legend whose name will live in history long after all here today have been for gotten. >> fate looked down kindly on us when she chose the mail to be the first to venture to another world and to have the opportunity to look back from space at the beauty of our a
to the woodrow wilson center. thank you for joining us. >> pleasure to be here. >> eric: are you surprised at morsi, what he did? and how it is now unfolding in egypt? >> the good news is you have a civilian, in theically elected president. the arab states are much more adept at acquiring power than sharing it. muhammad morsi comes from a party that is exclusivist and comes from the party, the muslim brotherhood and it's my way or the highway. so if there was an opportunity to consolidate power to make sure that the constituent assembly is filled with his supporters, traditional mudz muslims, looking to make it a more conservative, traditional state, he will take it. there is opposition. i just wonder whether the seculars and the liberals have the kind of street cred and fire power in the proverbial streets to really provide an effective counter challenge over time. >> eric: it seems the islamists and the muslim brotherhood would have an upper hand and would win any type of confrontation. >> i think that certainly is the way it's played out over the last year or so. but you have the milita
of an event at the woodrow wilson center. we'll have that for you begin at noon eastern on a companion network c-span. back on c-span2, halfhearted it's julius genachowski. you will talk about documentation sponsor. this comes to life in the council life in the council on foreign relations. and be sure to join us tonight for an event from the washington ideas for. it likely roundtable discussion with president obama, look at america's strategic competitiveness and a speech about drones warfare. again that starts at 8 p.m. eastern right here on c-span2. >> there are many people who might even take issue with grant saving the union during the civil war, didn't lincoln do that? well, yeah, he did and i'm not going to say grant was the only person who saved the union. but he was the commanding general of the army that put blankets policies into effect. and he was the general who accepted the surrender of the army of northern virginia. under robert e. lee the end of the war. so if anybody won the war on the battlefield, if you could say that any one person did, and, of course, you can't, but one of
wilson international center. colletti, let me start with you. do you have a sense of this having lasting power? is this a deep movement or is this a shallow movement? >> well, it's a very good question. of course, we have seen many times over the last 20 months or so where various groups have rallied in and around tahrir square with various demands. this time though, i think we're seeing something, there's something is a little bit different in that they are speaking in a much more unified voice. t the opposition, the nonislamist opposition is for the first time in a very long time, at least reading from the same sheet of music. whether that will last i think is the question. >> briefly, if you could, what are the actual powers that the president has taken unto himself? >> well, it's more like what powers hasn't he undertaken? he has full executive authority. he has also full legislative authority and he's essentially neutralized the third branch, which is the judiciary. so they are now unable to challenge any of his decisions. and this is far more sweeping than anything that the previou
on their network. that's like building 4 nat's stadiums, 5 wilson bridges, and 8 dc convention centers...all in onene year. and not a penny of it comes from taxpayers. look, the reason i'm in this race there are people that are really hurting today in this country. and we face this deficit -- could crush the fure generations. and republicans and democrats both love america but we need to have leadership -- leadership in washington that will actually bring people together and get the job done and could not care less if it's a republican or a democrat. i've done it before, i'll do it again. i'm mitt romney, and i approve this message. freight railroads plan to spend $23 billion on their network. i'm mitt romney, that's like launching 4 mars roversrs, 10 gps satellites, and 20 space shuttles ...all in one year.
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family. meanwhile, across town, secret service agents guarded governor romney at the wilson mills shopping center located in richmond heights. supporters snapped pictures and many were shocked to see him here in ohio so we're still waiting for r the major polls to bring in their votes. they're brought in by memory stick but now things are looking good for president obama. reporting in cleveland. >> still a lot left here on election night. >> we're going to bring you the latest on the races and also question 7. which i say chan schaefer is -- christian schaefer is there and we'll hear from him after this break. let's get back to another hot issue, expanded gambling. they put the matter to you. >> that's right it comes down to tonight. christian schaefer is live with the proposed casino vote. >> a lot of people thought that back when maryland added casino gambling that this would be the most lucrative sight to put a casino. it's right across from virginia which has no gambling at all and also millions of people visit the dc area every year and this location is convenient for a
comprehensive about covering the different, both the house and senate and different other woodrow wilson center and other public affair centers here in ck that i wouldn't normally be exposed to. >> jeff wright watches c-span on comcast, c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979 brought to you as a public service by your cable television provider. >> next, former obama adviser, dennis ross and former george w. bush adviser, james jeffrey, discuss challenges facing president obama in his second term in the middle east. they look at unrest in syria and concerns about egypt's new government. this is an hour and 30 minutes. [inaudible conversations] >> good afternoon. good afternoon, and welcome to the washington institute. i'm rob sadloff and delighted to see you here today. i think the interest in foreign policy in the wake of our presidential election is certainly evidence by the standing remotely crowd we have here today. we are now already into the process of transition, a transition even with the same president, transitions are the most flute and receptive moments in the presidentia
the various results now with linda killian, senior scholar at the woodrow wilson international center and author of the book, "the swing vote: the untapped power of independents." and stuart rothenberg of the rothenberg political report and roll call, my side-kick and our go-to analyst last night during our election special. a very long special. welcome back, stuart. >> thanks. >> brown: hello to linda. stu, let me start with you. on the one hand you end up with the status quo in congress, right. on the other hand, given where things started the democrats did quite well, especially in those tight senate races. so a at a later, what can we say? >> absolutely. you're right. things stayed the same bought they didn't. the taste in ourselves mouths at the end of this election was better for the democrats than republicans. in the senate, the democrats added two senate seats, really a remarkable outcome upon. if a year ago you asked me what would happen i would have told you republicans would pick up between three and six senate seats, and instead, instead the democrats gained two. it was a
is aaron david miller, vice president of the woodrow wilson international center for scholars. it's a long title there. welcome back. you and i have spoken before about these conflicts in the past. will these violent eruptions continue as long as hamas is in power, mr. miller? >> i mean, look, the reality is, don, last time you and i talked about this in '08 and '09, we agreed, i think, you can't have solutions, only outcomes and that's what you've had for four years. in large part because you've got israel and hamas, the religious manifestation of palestinian nationalism that have fundamentally different objectives, both military, security and political objectives. so under the best of circumstances, given the track that everybody is on, we can hope, perhaps, for another interim agreement that somehow stabilizes the situation. if you wanted more than that, if you really wanted more, you would have to do a couple things that right now neither the americans, the israelis and the palestinians are willing or able, frankly, to do. and that, i think, is the real tragedy here, because chances ar
on their network. that's like building 4 nat's stadiums, 5 wilson bridges, and 8 dc convention centers...all in one year. and not a penny of it comes from taxpayers. better phone, better internet. it was like somebody like took our computer, shook all the junk out of it. we're actually getting more for our money with fios. [ male announcer ] why settle for second best? visit verizon.com/whyfios now and see if you qualify for a $5 amazon gift card. there's no purchase necessary. there's at least three computers. [ girl 1 ] a tablet. [ woman 1 ] couple of gaming systems. we could all be running at the same time. we do not notice any dips. [ male announcer ] don't wait. visit us online right now to see if you qualify for a $5 amazon gift card. and wle you'rerthere, see how you can upgrade to 100% fiber optic fios internet, tv and phone for as low as $84.99 a month with no annual contract. with fios, the internet was five gabillion times faster. fios gives me way more for my money. my life is greatly improved because of fios. [ male announcer ] hurry. go to verizon.com/whyfios right now. a $5 amazon gi
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wilson bridges, and 8 dc convention centers...all in one year. and not a penny of it comes from taxpayers. freight railroads plan to spendd $23 billion on their network. that's like launching 4 mars rovers, 10 gps satellites, and 20 space shuttles ...all in one year. and not a penny of it comes from taxpayers. >>> if you want to know what jamie dimon thinks, just ask. the outspoken chairman of jpmorgan chase is an important voice for the financial industry and not short of opinions. i oke to him about politics, policy and regulation this week. >> the foundation of business is pretty strong. companies are in good shape, a lot of cash. middle market companies, small business. if you look at the numbers, housing looks like it is turning, household formation is going up. business itself looks pretty good and i think the american economy -- to me the most important thing is we solve the short-run fiscal cliff and the long rloun issues and if we do that the economy can boom. hope that proem works on that and i think he has been working on that. >> what are the implications of going over the fis
's returned to the woodrow wilson center, and he's currently focusing on a book of changes underway in the arab world. he has dedication to getting the story firsthand, and we look forward to benefiting from his wise perspective. dr. ottaway, thank you. >> thank you and good afternoon. i was given a list of questions that i might address and asked to talk about tunisia, and the list -- i think john drew it up -- was far too long for a seven minute talk, so i chose two questions i wanted to address. the first one is, is constitutional reform from the bottom up through coalition politics as is happening in several arab republics likely to be more successful and enduring than reform from the top, vastly preferred by the arab monarchies? and the second question related, to what extent do these reforms serve as a possible model for the monarchies and particularly the gulf arab monarchies? now, in thinking about this issue what first struck me is that the, what's happening in the three monarchies, i mean, the three republics i want to talk about today, tunisia, egypt and libya, how differ
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 92 (some duplicates have been removed)